Reflected Passion by Erica LawsonReflected Passion by Erica Lawson is one of those really cool love stories that span time and space.

Dale is a furniture restorer. She comes from a wealthy family and turned her back on her parents’ wealth in favour of living her life without her mother’s strings. She loves what she does and one day she finds an old mirror in a second hand store. She is intrigued by the mirror and hangs it on her wall.

One night she wakes to hear the sounds of passion coming from the mirror. She peers in and sees Francoise, a beautiful French woman with another woman. Their eyes meet and there is an instant attraction.

Their attraction grows and one night Dale steps through the mirror to be with the mysterious beauty who has been haunting her.

Francoise is in France just before the French revolution.

Will Dale leave the comforts of present time in favour of the dangerous time with Francoise?

The Characters

Both women are well written and believable. The journey they go through is one of discovery as they learn about each other and are forced to make tough decisions.

A handful of side characters round off the book nicely.

The Writing Style

The story is written in the first person as Dale tells us what happens. I am not generally a huge fan of first person stories, but Lawson manages this one with a subtlety that is often missing from first person tales.

The pacing is good and the events are interesting.

The Pros

I loved the unexpected story, the fantastic characters and the fact that the one woman had to dress as a man and pretend to be one in order to protect the other.

The Cons

No cons. I enjoyed the book and would recommend it.

sheena's favouriteThe Conclusion

Definitely worth a read. It’s a fantastic romance and I highly recommend it.

Excerpt from Reflected Passion by Erica Lawson

As I stared at my reflection, an image emerged underneath it. Seated on a large bed was a nude woman. I closed my eyed to try and clear my mind of any thought and reopened them, The image was still there. My raven-haired woman perched on the edge of her bed while another woman knelt between her spread legs.

I couldn’t help myself. I gasped. Rather loudly, it seemed, because the woman opened her eyed and stared directly at me. Embarrassed, I backed away and out of sight. This couldn’t be happening. Was it my mind telling me something I didn’t want to know? Why was it happening now? I would see a doctor tomorrow…or visit a lesbian bar tomorrow night.

The sounds continued to emanate from the glass, and I again found myself drawn to them. Hallucination or no, I was curious, as a previously unknown voyeuristic tendency showed itself. I felt like I was on a balcony, looking down onto a stage as the play unfolded. The woman’s eyes were closed and a beguiling smile graced her full lips as the woman kneeling in front of her pleasured her. I couldn’t see exactly what was going on because her tiny body blocked my view, but my mind filled in the visual gaps. I might not be gay, but I knew enough to know what was happening.

I felt that tingling in my stomach again. It gnawed at me as I watched them together. Those dark eyes opened and met mine, her excitement rising with every second. She didn’t acknowledge her companion because her eyes were solely on me. I felt a light sweat break out on my skin, flushed with a rush of adrenaline, as she drew me in to feel her pleasure as my own.

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Bits and Bobs

ISBN number: 9781927328750

Publisher: Affinity Ebook Press NZ LTD

Awesome links:

Erica Lawson’s website

Sheena is the founder of The Lesbian Review.

She discovered lesbian fiction when she was 19. Radclyffe and Karin Kallmaker soon became favourite authors and she spent a large part of her hard earned income on shipping books from Amazon.com to her home in South Africa.

Over the years she became frustrated with purchasing mediocre lesbian fiction feeling like it was a waste of her money and time. And so she decided to share only the best books and movies with lesbians who are looking for only the best. And so, The Lesbian Review was born